Living

From our Files – Week of July 6, 2022

50 Years Ago — July 13, 1972

   Madawaska bus drivers participate in a workshop Bus drivers participated in a safety workshop conducted in 1972 by Reno Deprey, a driver education instructor at Madawaska High School.

Certificates were handed out to Ronald Deschaine, Clifford Michaud, Willard Deschaine, Alphie Dionne, Josephel Cote, Saul Gervais, George Emile Deschaine and Paul Beaulieu. The purpose of this program was to make the drivers more aware of their responsibilities in the transportation of students.

    25 Years Ago — July 2, 1997

Voters plan for school closure — Voters told the school board on a Thursday in 1997 to prepare a school closure plan for the Grand Isle Elementary School. Some of those in attendance expressed real frustration with how slowly the school board has acted on the offer from the Madawaska School Department to tuition the Grand Isle elementary students to Madawaska Elementary School. Many said they do not understand why the school board is not looking for the solution that saves the most money but instead seems to be fighting to keep the Grand Isle Elementary School open. Although the first year, and possibly the first two years, costs will actually rise for education in Grand Isle, by the third year, the cost, and the burden on taxpayers will drop, according to figures provided by both Madawaska and Grand Isle superintendents.

10 Years Ago — July 4, 2012

2012 Farm Family of the Year — The Maine Potato Board announced the Rudy Parent family of Hamlin as its 2012 Farm Family of the Year, according to a press release from the Presque Isle-based industry group. Rudy, his wife Dinah, his sons Jaimie and Nick, as well as his brother Bill farm 1,200 acres in the St. John Valley. Jaimie is the seventh generation to work this land. Rudy started farming right out of high school in 1970, and he purchased the farm from his father Gerard in 1986.

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