News

Hayes to discuss global impact of forests

FORT KENT, Maine – The University of Maine at Fort Kent Environmental Studies Speaker Series will host a presentation by Dr. Daniel Hayes on Friday, March 3, from 1 to 2 p.m. in UMFK’s Nadeau Hall conference room.

The presentation is titled, “Forests and the Global Carbon Cycle.” Hayes will discuss the role forests have in carbon cycling and how that plays into global climate patterns. The event is free and the public is encouraged to attend.

Hayes is an assistant professor of geospatial analysis and remote sensing and director of Barbara Wheatland Geospatial Analysis Laboratory at the University of Maine at Orono.

Dr. Hayes’ research, teaching, and outreach interests broadly involve scaling questions and geospatial applications in forests and ecosystems.  His research activities range from historical remote sensing analysis of tropical deforestation to biogeochemical modeling of ecosystem-climate feedbacks in the Arctic; from airborne measurement of forest structure to national- and global- scale greenhouse gas inventories.

Dr. Daniel Hayes (Contributed photo)

Dr. Daniel Hayes (Contributed photo)

He is involved in various collaborative efforts including the interagency North American Carbon Program (NACP), NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), DOE’s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE-Arctic) and the NSF Permafrost Carbon Network.

The Environmental Studies Speaker Series at UMFK regularly brings speakers to campus. These presentations are open to the public and cover such topics as water quality, waste management, wind power, endangered species, forestry and marine science. The program is offered in collaboration with the UMFK Environmental Studies degree program. Speakers are only scheduled during the academic year.

For more information on the Environmental Studies Speaker Series, contact Dr. Peter Nelson, UMFK assistant professor of biological sciences and environmental studies, at (207) 834-7683.

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